Monday Devotional
No automatic alt text available.
Dear Friend,
 

Will Schwalbe, in his book “Books for Living”, tells about a very important teacher who made a lasting impression upon his life. But, the lesson was not in the way one might expect.

The teacher, Mr. Tracy, had assigned his high school students the task of writing a paper about any topic from classical literature and about which little was known. Will worked hard and turned in a paper that he thought was brilliant. When the paper was graded and returned, h

e was disappointed to discover that he had been given a C.

After class, Will spoke with Mr. Tracy and said that he thought he deserved a B. Without any emotion, Mr. Tracy received the paper, took out a big red felt tip marker and carefully crossed out the C, changing it to a B. He handed the paper back and then said, “Are you sure you don’t want an A?”

Will was dumbfounded and unprepared for this question. Mr. Tracy continued saying, “It’s a C paper. No matter what grade I put on it, it’s still a C paper. But I’m happy to give it a B or even an A. In fact, why don’t you tell me what grade you want when you hand in each paper for the rest of the term and save me the trouble of grading them.”
Now Will felt bad and had to beg Mr. Tracy to reinstate the original grade of C.

Many years later Will, now a prominent journalist, recognizes the gift of that very awkward moment. He came to understand that a C means that you have done average work. You didn’t fail or even come close to failing. You did what you were supposed to do. It is also recognition that there is room to grow and opportunities to do better. He also saw this as a lesson in humility. In anything in life, no matter how good you are at something, there is likely someone better. These are the ones who can teach us more, who can inspire us to be better, who can help us achieve a bit more than we dreamed possible.

It is true in all circumstances. We do not achieve perfection, but our imperfections can inspire us to continue to learn and grow beyond our present circumstances.

Peace,

Howard